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Father-child dyads exhibit unique inter-subject synchronization during co-viewing of animation video stimuli.

  • Academic Journal
  • Azhari A; Psychology Program, School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.
    Bizzego A; Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.
    Esposito G; Psychology Program, School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.; Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.; Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.
  • Social neuroscience [Soc Neurosci] 2021 Oct; Vol. 16 (5), pp. 522-533. Date of Electronic Publication: 2021 Aug 27.
  • English
  • Inter-subject synchronization reflects the entrainment of two individuals to each other's brain signals. In parent-child dyads, synchronization indicates an attunement to each other's emotional states. Despite the ubiquity with which parents and their children watch screen media together, no study has investigated synchronization in father-child dyads during co-viewing. The present study examined whether father-child dyads would exhibit inter-subject synchronization that is unique to the dyad and hence would not be observed in control dyads (i.e., randomly paired signals). Hyperscanning fNIRS was used to record the prefrontal cortex (PFC) signals of 29 fathers and their preschool-aged children as they co-viewed children's shows. Three 1-min videos from "Brave", "Peppa Pig" and "The Incredibles" were presented to each dyad and children's ratings of video positivity and familiarity were obtained. Four PFC clusters were analyzed: medial left, medial right, frontal left and frontal right clusters. Results demonstrated that true father-child dyads showed significantly greater synchronization than control dyads in the medial left cluster during the emotionally arousing conflict scene. Dyads with older fathers displayed less synchrony and older fathers, compared to younger ones, exhibited greater activity. These findings suggest unique inter-subject synchronization in father-child dyads during co-viewing which is potentially modulated by parental age.
Additional Information
Publisher: Routledge Country of Publication: England NLM ID: 101279009 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1747-0927 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 17470919 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Soc Neurosci Subsets: MEDLINE
Publication: 2013- : London : Routledge
Original Publication: Hove : Psychology Press, c2006-
Keywords: Synchrony*; co-viewing*; fNIRS*; father-child*; inter-subject synchronization*; narrative scene*; parent-child*; prefrontal cortex*; video stimuli*
Date Created: 20210819 Date Completed: 20220429 Latest Revision: 20220429
20220908
10.1080/17470919.2021.1970016
34407724

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