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No Exit: China's State Surveillance over People Who Use Drugs.

  • Academic Journal
  • Lin M; Independent consultant based in Beijing, China.
    Sun N; Clinical assistant professor and deputy director of the Office of Global Health, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA.
    Amon JJ; Clinical professor and director of the Office of Global Health, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA.
  • Health and human rights [Health Hum Rights] 2022 Jun; Vol. 24 (1), pp. 135-146.
  • English
  • In China, although drug use is an administrative and not criminal offense, individuals detained by public security authorities are subject to coercive or compulsory "treatment," which can include community-based detoxification and rehabilitation and two years of compulsory isolation. Individuals are also entered into a system called the Drug User Internet Dynamic Control and Early Warning System, or simply the Dynamic Control System. The Dynamic Control System, run by the Ministry of Public Security, acts as an extension of China's drug control efforts by monitoring the movement of people in the system and alerting police when individuals, for example, use their identity documents when registering at a hotel, conducting business at a government office or bank, registering a mobile phone, applying for tertiary education, or traveling. This alert typically results in an interrogation and a drug test by police. This paper seeks to summarize, using published government reports, news articles, and academic papers, what is known about the Dynamic Control System, focusing on the procedures of (1) registration; (2) management; and (3) exit. At each step, people subject to the Dynamic Control System face human rights concerns, especially related to the right to privacy, rights to education and work, and right to health.
    Competing Interests: Competing interests: None declared.
    (Copyright © 2022 Lin, Sun, and Amon.)
Additional Information
Publisher: Harvard School of Public Health, François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights Country of Publication: United States NLM ID: 9502498 Publication Model: Print Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 2150-4113 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 10790969 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Health Hum Rights Subsets: MEDLINE
Original Publication: Boston, MA : Harvard School of Public Health, François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, c1994-
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Date Created: 20220624 Date Completed: 20220627 Latest Revision: 20220716
20220908
PMC9212834
35747288

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