scroll to top
0

Mobile Menu

Header Layout

EBSCO Auth Banner

Let's find your institution. Click here.

Page title

Testing the performance of sensors for ozone pollution monitoring in a citizen science approach.

  • Academic Journal
  • Ripoll A; Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), 08034 Barcelona, Spain.
    Viana M; Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), 08034 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: mar.viana@idaea.csic.es.
    Padrosa M; Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), 08034 Barcelona, Spain.
    Querol X; Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), 08034 Barcelona, Spain.
    Minutolo A; Legambiente Onlus, 00199 Rome, Italy.
    Hou KM; LIMOS Laboratory, UMR 6158, CNRS, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Barcelo-Ordinas JM; Department of Computer Architecture, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), 08034 Barcelona, Spain.
    Garcia-Vidal J; Department of Computer Architecture, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), 08034 Barcelona, Spain.
  • The Science of the total environment [Sci Total Environ] 2019 Feb 15; Vol. 651 (Pt 1), pp. 1166-1179. Date of Electronic Publication: 2018 Sep 22.
  • English
  • Tropospheric ozone (O 3 ) is an environmental pollutant of growing concern, especially in suburban and rural areas where the density of air quality monitoring stations is not high. In this type of areas citizen science strategies can be useful tools for awareness raising, but sensor technologies must be validated before sensor data are communicated to the public. In this work, the performance under field conditions of two custom-made types of ozone sensing devices, based on metal-oxide and electrochemical sensors, was tested. A large array of 132 metal-oxide (Sensortech MICS 2614) and 11 electrochemical (Alphasense) ozone sensors, built into 44 sensing devices, was co-located at reference stations in Italy (4 stations) and Spain (5). Mean R 2 between sensor and reference data was 0.88 (0.78-0.96) and 0.89 (0.73-0.96) for Captor (metal-oxide) and Raptor (electrochemical) nodes. The metal-oxide sensors showed an upper limit (approximately 170 μg/m 3 ) implying that these sensors may be useful to communicate mean ozone concentrations but not peak episodes. The uncertainty of the nodes was 10% between 100 and 150 μg/m 3 and 20% between 150 and 200 μg/m 3 , for Captors, and 10% for >100 μg/m 3 for Raptors. Operating both types of nodes up to 5 months did not evidence any clear influence of drifts. The use of these sensors in citizen science can be a useful tool for awareness raising. However, significant data processing efforts are required to ensure high data quality, and thus machine learning strategies are advisable. Relative uncertainties should always be reported when communicating ozone concentration data from sensing nodes.
    (Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.)
Additional Information
Publisher: Elsevier Country of Publication: Netherlands NLM ID: 0330500 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1879-1026 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 00489697 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Sci Total Environ Subsets: MEDLINE
Original Publication: Amsterdam, Elsevier.
Keywords: Awareness; Low-cost sensors; Node; Performance; Platform; Uncertainty; Validation
0 (Air Pollutants)
66H7ZZK23N (Ozone)
Date Created: 20181027 Date Completed: 20181121 Latest Revision: 20181202
20220902
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.257
30360248

banner_970x250 (970x250)

sponsored