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[THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN EXPOSURE TO TRAUMA AND MENTAL ILLNESS AMONG WORK MIGRANTS AND ASYLUM SEEKERS IN ISRAEL: A SURVEY AT THE OPEN CLINIC, PHYSICIANS FOR HUMAN RIGHTS, 2012-2013].

  • Academic Journal
  • Lurie I; Shalvata Mental Health Center, Hod Hasharon, Israel.; Department of Psychiatry, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.; Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Nakash O; Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel.
    Gerber Y; Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Gross R; Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.; Department of Psychiatry, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
  • Harefuah [Harefuah] 2019 Jul; Vol. 158 (7), pp. 432-436.
  • Hebrew
  • Introduction: In 2012, 183,896 work migrants and 47,704 asylum-seekers and work-migrants arrived in Israel. These populations are at high-risk for depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Open Clinic of Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) delivers free medical and mental health services to these individuals.
    Aims: To evaluate exposure to traumatic events, and compare the prevalence and risk for PTSD, depression and anxiety symptoms between work-migrants and asylum-seekers.
    Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study of adults visiting the Open Clinic was conducted. Participants completed self-report questionnaires including information on demographics and exposure to traumas, depression, anxiety and PTSD. Statistical models were constructed to predict outcome variables of PTSD, depression and anxiety as dichotomist variables using a logistic regression, and association odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval (CI) on 95% level.
    Results: There were 241 participants; 165 asylum-seekers, 76 work-migrants. Work-migrants were exposed to more traumatic events. A total of 17-31% met PTSD criteria. Significantly more asylum-seekers met PTSD criteria. A total of 43%-50% met criteria for depression and/or anxiety, with no between-group differences. Significant association was found between immigration status and PTSD risk. Exposure to traumatic events was significantly associated with the prediction of PTSD, depression and anxiety.
    Discussion: Exposure to traumatic events was high among the Open Clinic service users, specifically work-migrants. Prevalence and risk for post-traumatic symptoms were significantly higher among asylum-seekers. It is important to conduct further research, in order to characterize risk and resilience factors in this excluded population, and to plan language and culture-competent mental health services.
Additional Information
Publisher: Israel Medical Association Country of Publication: Israel NLM ID: 0034351 Publication Model: Print Cited Medium: Print ISSN: 0017-7768 (Print) Linking ISSN: 00177768 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Harefuah Subsets: MEDLINE
Original Publication: Tel Aviv : Israel Medical Association
Date Created: 20190725 Date Completed: 20190926 Latest Revision: 20190926
20211214
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